January 15, 2018

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Gear › Pro Tips ›


Try Hot Glue when "Fixing" your custom-fit SUP Paddle

Try using hot glue when attaching your paddle board handle to the shaft instead of epoxy.  When the great sport of SUP, stand up paddle boarding, started and carbon fiber and fiberglass paddleboard paddles were coming more common, the traditional way of affixing the sup handle to the shaft was with two part epoxy.  Now using epoxy is a tried and true method, the only problem is this way becomes permanent.  In the case where you would like to shorten your paddle as your skills progress for example, well you're out of luck.  Or in the case if you happen to damage just the handle portion of your paddle and it needs replacing, again you're out of luck if you had used epoxy.  In order to remove a handle from a paddleboard paddle after using epoxy, you must cut the handle off, usually loosing several inches off the shaft and loose the ability to re-use the handle after it's off. 

Here at North 2 Boards, we have been using hot glue with great success over the years.  We like to use ACE brand "Hot Melt" sticks.  They are a little be more expensive compared with standard craft type sticks, but are worth the investment in our opinion.  I think a pack of 6 runs around $5-$6 at your local ACE hardware store. Similarly contractors grade or construction grade sticks will do the trick as well.  After making your cut on the shaft, we like to use a standard 12" hacksaw with 32 tooth fine blade, simply heat up the shaft of the handle and top of the shaft with a hair dryer or heat gun.  Then generously add a bunch of globs of the hot melt glue onto the shaft of the handle before you put it into your paddle shaft.  Line up the handle to the blade so it is facing the correct direction and make sure it's lined up nice and straight. I then take a piece of scrape paper and wipe around the area where the glue has spilled out onto the shaft, you can then heat this area up again with a couple quick blast from your heat gun and again wipe around the shaft so that it is nice and neat. Set the paddle aside for about a half hour and you're off to the races! 

Down the road if you ever want to shorten your paddle or replace the handle, simply heat the joined areas of the handle and shaft with your heat gun or hair dryer and pull and remove. Cut shaft shorter, remove as much old glue as you can and repeat the process. 

Give it a shot, or contact us for more tips on how to. info@north2boards.com 

May 12, 2017

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Pro Tips › Surf ›


Tips for Paddle Surfing

So you have mastered the basics of paddle stroke and are comfortable and nimble on your stand up paddle board.  Now you're thinking of trying your luck in the waves.  One of the funnest ways to enjoy paddle boarding is through paddle surfing.  You've probably seen experienced paddle boarders out off the beach riding wave after wave and having a blast doing it, now it's your turn.  We have put together a couple tips for those new to paddle surfing.

Even if you have "regular" surfed there are a couple things to keep in mind while enjoying waves on your SUP.  While those who surf will normally be able to pick up paddle surfing without a hitch, the two different forms of wave riding do require a little bit different technique.  First you want to take a look at what board you're planning on using to paddle surf.  Obviously the smaller the SUP board the lighter it will be and also more maneuverable in the surf.  That's not to say that you can't go out and catch 2 footers on an 11' Surf Style paddle board and not have fun, but there are a couple things to keep in mind when using larger heavier paddle boards in the waves.  First and foremost be mindful of where you are!! Stand up paddleboards are normally (For regular 9'-12' boards) larger and heavier than your average surfboard, and thus can cause more damage or injury if the surfer using it doesn't know what he or she is doing.  

Hey the ocean is free for everyone to enjoy but lets not forget about etiquette.  It's always a good idea for inexperienced paddle surfers to stay well away from any populated surf break where active surfing amongst a group of surfers is occurring.  That is the beauty of SUP, you get to paddle away to your own uncrowded corner of the sea!  No reason to be piled up at a local surf break trying to navigate amongst several surfers, and trust me you won't be popular on your stand up paddle board attempting to do so, especially if you're new to the sport.  It's best to learn away from anyone so that you can focus on your wave catching technique. Also learn on VERY small waves to start and then gradually go up from there, don't kill yourself trying to charge 6 footers day one!  Even a lot of experienced paddle surfers and just surfers in general rarely enjoy surfing at crowded peaks as they log more time on the water.  There is something to be said that the best waves ridden are the ones where it's just you and the wave and a big smile on your face!

Normally people get into paddle surfing using larger SUP boards, say around 10' X 31" for example.  Our N2 10' Cardiff or 10' Sessions are examples of a great boards to learn with.  So you want to be able to be somewhat nimble on your SUP board for starters, this might mean several hours of flat water paddling getting comfortable on your board, so when you make the transition from your normal parallel legged stance to surf stance it is seamless and not clunky.  Learning the "Quick Turn" or pivot turn is a good idea.  This maneuver is basically when you drop your (either left for goofy foot surfer, or right for regular foot) foot backwards about a foot or more, which causes the board to pivot quickly in the water to what ever direction you want the nose of the board to face. Practicing and mastering the quick turn will allow you to quickly turn your board when you see a wave approaching and position yourself correctly to paddle into the wave. 

Quick Turn Video Here VIDEO 

Learning where to position yourself for breaking waves is also important.  You want to be able to paddle into a wave just before it crests and starts to break.  Also like traditional surfing you want to anlge the nose of the board so that it is going the same direction as the wave energy, get into the habit of doing this when you're just starting out.  As your paddle surfing progresses you will get more adept at knowing how to position yourself to be in the best location to catch the most waves. But remember no matter who you're surfing with and where, share the waves don't be a wave hog! Paddle early and often into the wave until you feel the wave pushing you and bend your knees! 

Especially when you're a new to paddle surfing, ALWAYS wear a surf leash.  It's also a good idea to be mindful of the current swell and wind patterns. Rule of thumb is offshore or West wind (East Coast USA) always makes for smoother and cleaner ocean conditions, which means better surfing conditions especially for novice surfers. Onshore of East winds makes the water and surf break choppy and disorganized, which in some cases can also be very dangerous.  So always take a look at local beach cams and surf reports before heading down to the beach when paddle surfing.  

Shorter paddles, which allow you to make quicker paddle strokes and switch the paddle from side to side quicker normally is the preference for experienced paddle surfers.  But if you only have one paddle and it is fixed for more flat water paddling, that's ok it will work just fine as you're learning to paddle surf.  Fin set up is another story that I won't get into just now, but this also come into play for those looking to increase their surfing performance.  Remember to have fun! If you're not having fun whats the point right, but also be safe and keep the people around you safe too.  Here is a video that pulls it all together. Thanks guys, see you in the water!

Paddle Surfing Tips Here VIDEO  

 

April 09, 2017

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Florida › Pro Tips ›


Spring time is here, time to get out and paddle! A few Palm Beach County Paddle Board spots from North 2.

Well it's that time of the year again, spring time and summer are right around the corner.  Here are some local South Florida, Palm Beach County, Stand up Paddle Board spots that will get you out on the water! 

Here at N2 headquarters in the Boynton Beach/ Delray Beach area, we are lucky to have great paddle board weather year round.  In South Florida the water activities including SUP never really stop, although spring time brings out more locals again as well as tourists that flock to our warm beaches to enjoy the natural beauty of Florida.  At N2 we paddle year round and here are some of our favorite spots. 

1) Delray Beach Public Beach10 N Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach, FL 33483.  

There are several pay per park lots along the A1A stretch of Delray's Public Beach, Including lots where you can use credit card ("Marriott" lot, located on the NW corner of the Marriott hotel, Sarah Gleason Park, Sandoway Park, Anchor Park, and Atlantic Dunes Park).  Also you can park along A1A using quarters in traditioal meter parking, and coming soon we have heard you will be able to use your credit card at these A1A meters as well.  Right now the rate is $150/hr. of parking. Keep in mind there are two "recreational" areas on Delray Public Beach (During regular "guarded" hours) that you're allowed to lunch and land water craft, including Stand up Paddle Boards. The very north end of the beach, just past the "North 2" lifeguard tower you'll see a sign that shows the recreational zone just north of the sign intself, also on the very south end of the beach near "kite beach" you'll have the same recreational zone.  Some great surf can be found along this stretch of beach, and is recognized as one of the best surf sports in all of South Florida.  Also bring along your snorkel mask and check out the wreck of the SS Inchulva located about 150 yards off the south end of the beach.  SS Inchulva Wreck 

2) Ocean Inlet Park, 6990 N Ocean Blvd, Ocean Ridge, FL 33435

Free parking, but get there early on the weekends to secure a spot! For some great flat water paddling, put in at the little sandy beach area just west of the park entrance.  Make sure you have your PFD (personal flotation device) with you if you're going to paddle in the intercostal per the USCG regulations, you definitely don't want to ruin your day with a fat ticket from a LE officer.  Also a good idea to have a good quality surf leash attached to you at all times for safety. You can paddle north, past the inlet that goes out to the ocean, and around and along "Beer Can Island." There you'll find a great sandbar that becomes fully exposed on low tide, and is a popular spot for boats to anchor and hangout.  I have seen bonefish, spinner sharks, and lots of other sea life in this area.  Or paddle south and hug the coast under several bridges that will bring you out to a large mangrove forest that you can explore. Look for manatees here during certain times of the year.  You can also walk across the street and paddle out in the ocean.  Just south of the inlet, from about 30 to 150 yards off shore you'll find lots of rock reef to explore to free dive.  For surfing, when the swell is big enough, surf the sandbar break that pops up just to the south east of the inlet itself and about 80-100 yards off shore. Head-high 100 yard rides can be had here when the time is right! Make sure you watch for incoming and outgoing boats if you're prone or paddle surfing here.  

3) Lake Boca (Silver Palm Park), 600 E Palmetto Park Rd, Boca Raton, FL 33432

Free parking, but limited. Make sure you're a strong paddler before getting into this area of Boca Lake, especially if you plan to paddle against the strong tidal current which at times becomes very strong through the bridge underpass of E Palmetto Park Road.  Great place to put your paddle board in and explore the lake, and if you time it  close to high tide, the water will normally be crystal clear.  Paddle north into Lake Wynman and see lots of wildlife along the way. 

4) Lake Ida Delray Beach (Lakeview Park)1100 Lake Dr, Delray Beach, FL 33444

Great place to get a flat water paddle in. Free parking, and great place to practice your SUP paddle techniques and fitness.  I tend to keep to the banks of the lake as I travel north or south to avoid the boats and jet skis that like to utilize this local Delray gem.  You can paddle south west and make your way into the canal that you can take and explore Delray neighborhoods by water.  During the week it sees very little motorized water craft use, but the weekends can get hairy in there for people looking to get out and do some SUP. 

5) Peanut Island (Riviera Beach, FL), 900 E. Blue Heron Blvd, Riviera Beach, Florida 33404

The great thing about Stand up Paddleboarding is that ability to use your SUP as a platform to do other fun things like paddle-snorkeling! Head up to the West Palm Beach, FL area and check out Phil Foster Park.  Free parking here allows you to launch your board and head about a 1/4 miles south to explore the water around the famous Peanut Island.  The only way to access the island is by watercraft. You can spend a couple hours walking and exploring the island which has a lot of interesting history, including a cold war fallout bunker for past president JFK.  Just off shore of the island are some awesome rock reefs that are home for thousands of tropical fish, so don't forget your snorkel mask! 

 

February 02, 2017

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Gear › Pro Tips ›


North 2 Boards, Un-Boxing your new SUP, Paddle board set up, SUP Gear

Here's a video we just put together that covers many different topics on your stand up paddleboard! Thanks for watching. 

January 25, 2017

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Florida › Pro Tips ›


Stand up Paddle Board Weeki Wachee Springs, FL

We are truly blessed to have such amazing natural wonders of natural springs in our great state of Florida.  There is no better way to explore and navigate these crystal clear bodies of water than with a North 2 Stand up Paddle Board. On a recent trip to central Flroida I had the opportunity to visit the Weeki Wachee Spring, located at 6131 Commercial Way, Spring Hill, FL 34606.

When you first arrive at Weeki Wachee and see the water, you are blown away by the purity and clarity of the natural spring water.  Shades of turquoise blue and green along with numerous fish and wildlife species make it an unbelievable natural setting. SUP in the natural springs of FL is allowed, but there are designated areas where water craft aren't allowed to go, so make sure you are aware of where you can paddle board. Also make sure you have a PFD (Personal Flotation Device) with you, per USCG regs, and a leash is also a good idea for safety since some springs have a pretty descent moving current. I found it so cool to see freshwater and salt water fish mingling together, since most of the springs find their way into the Gulf of Mexico.  Most springs stay a consistent water temperature year round, for example Week Wachee stays a nice 72 degrees year round. Due to the consistent temperature, manatees will often move out of area salt water and up into the springs to escape winter cold fronts, that move down the Florida peninsula in the winter months.  

Most of the springs are located around west central and north west Florida, so the next time you are looking for an adventure in your back yard, grab your SUP and go paddle a Florida natural spring. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPRING INFO.  

September 07, 2016

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Gear › Pro Tips ›


More Paddle Science...

Interesting...within the relatively new sup industry there are numerous studies from the "experts" on the proper way to paddle for efficiency, power, and more important to prevent injury. Paddle lengths have gone from a foot or more over your head (based on extended arm length) to chin level and everywhere in-between.
Bottom line do what feels comfortable to you, and make sure you have fun and don't take it to serious, everyone is different but some good info here in this article.

http://www.sup-internationalmag.com/knowledge-paddle-science-3/?ref=supzero.com

August 22, 2016

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Gear › Pro Tips ›


Good Video to work on your paddle stroke!

Don't complicate things when trying to improve the efficiency of your paddle stroke.  Lots of stuff out there on the "proper" way to paddle.  I really like this short and sweet vid I saw on @SUPTHEMAG by Jay Wild. Makes a lot of sense and will make you a better paddler for sure.  Happy paddling friends! 

June 14, 2016

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Gear › Pro Tips ›


May 04, 2016

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Pro Tips › TeamN2 ›


Key West Paddle Classic Dog Tag Inlay into N2 SUP

Fun little DIY project that I felt compelled to do after completing the grueling 12 mile Key West, FL SUP race last weekend! 

YOGA EXPO, Fort Lauderdale May 2016

Wow, what a great turnout at this years YOGA EXPO, Fort Lauderdale, FL at the Broward County Convention Center. 

Yoga has so many amazing benefits it's easy to understand why so many people take part in this healthy activity on a regular basis.

We were super stoked to be asked to take part in the expo by owner of What's SUP Paddleboarding business, Chelsey Loder. http://paddleboardingfl.com.  We are honored that such a reputable and successful SUP business here in South Florida chooses to buy N2 boards for it's fleet of rental, and SUP YOGA boards! 

The N2 Cardiff,"1st Gen," 10' Big Boy Gulfstream, and Original range of boards, along with the N2 Adventure Air inflatable (Pictured below) make excellent SUP YOGA boards.

Why does SUP YOGA's popularity continue to grow so rapidly? 

1- It’s a fun practice but with some serious benefits. Doing yoga on a surface that is constantly in motion fires up your core muscles.
2- SUP yoga is a practice that brings a sense of joyful freedom to an otherwise earth-bound yoga practice.
3- It requires a different quality of focus, and not just when you’re doing the poses, but also when you’re transitioning between them.
4- You have no choice but to “be here now” when it comes to practicing yoga on your floating yoga mat.
5- If you like your yoga hot, practicing outdoors under the sunlight heat will create the same sweat. Plus you can cool down with an unlimited supply of water just beneath you.